II – Semester

II Semester M.A (English)
Academic Writing Course

A: Topics for discussion
Reading
Note-Making
Paraphrasing
How to write an effective paragraph
Critical Summary
Precis
Abstract
Comparison, contrast, Cause and Effect.
Writing an Annotated Bibliography

B: Writing an Essay for Academic Purposes
Comparison Essay
Discussion Essay

C: Readings
1. "The Charge of the Light Brigade": The Creation of a Poem, Edgar Shannon and Christopher Ricks, Studies in Bibliography
2. The Lure of Translingual Writing: Paul Kei Matsuda, PMLA Journal
3. We Want to Know Who Our Students Are: Patricia Bizzell, PMLA Journal
4. Integrating whose nation? Tourists and terrorists in 'Roja': Tejaswini Niranjana, Economic and Political Weekly.

D: References
Academic Writing: A handbook for international students, Stephen Bailey, Routledge, 2006.
Academic Writing: Study skills for students. R.R. Jordan, Longman, 1999.

E: Outcomes Internal Assessment to be based on periodic grading of paragraph writing, critical summary and bibliography skills. (30 marks)

End-semester Assessment: Viva based on portfolio submission of three essays in response to the readings prescribed above. The essays must each be of about 1500-2000 words in length and must display both a critical understanding and how well the student has understood the conventions followed in academic writing. (70 marks)

PAPER – II (i) BRITISH LITERATURE – PART- II

(60 HOURS)

Objectives:
1. To view English literary history in its socio-cultural and political contexts.
2. To create an awareness of the problems of canon formation and literary representation.

(The Jacobean Age (Restoration & after)
(a) Pope : Extract from “Epistle to Abuthnot”
(b) Aphra Behn: Oroonoko

(1) The Age of Prose (essayists & Journalism)

(a) Addison
: Selection from the Coverley Papers
(b) Johnson
: Letter to Chesterfield
(c) Mary (Wortley Montague
: Extract from Turkish Letters.


(2) Romanticism: Background
(a) Wordsworth
: Extract from the Immortality ode.
(b) Coleridge
: “Kubla Khan”
(c) Keats
: “ Ode on a Grecian Urn”
(d)Shelley
: “ Ode to the West Wind”
(e) Byron
: “ She walks in Beauty”
(f) Mary Wollstonecraft
: Introduction to “A Vindication to the Right of Women”


(3) The Victorian Age (Poetry) Background
(a) Browning
: “ My Last Duchess”
(b) Elizabeth Barett
: “ How do I love thee?”
(c) Tennyson
: “Ulysses”
(d) Arnold
: “Dover Beach”

PAPER – II (V) EUROPEAN CLASSICS REVISITED - PART –II

Objectives:
1. To help students read texts in the wider contexts of European history.
2. To encourage students to develop new and original methods of interpretation even while surveying ‘traditional’ texts.

Unit - 1
1) Boccaccio: Extract from Decameron

Unit - II
1) Extract from “What is Literature – Sartre(“Why Write”?)
2) Rousseau: Extract from Confessions
3) Goethe : Extract from Faust
4) Pushkin: The Bronze Horseman”
5) Gogol: The Over coat”
6) Flaubert: Film text of Madame Bovary, directed by Claude Chabrol.


PAPER – II (iii) INDIAN LITERATURES IN ENGLISH – PART- II

(60 HOURS)

Objectives:
1. To understand both Indian Writing in English and regional literatures in India translated into English as part of Indian Literatures.
2. To show students a cultural world they are familiar with, and to show the prevalence of several cultural world within any apparently uniform culture.

Indian Writing in English Translation: Vignettes

Unit – I: Re-reading Pre-modern Texts

Vachanas
: Basavanna, Akka Mahadevi (Selections from Signs)
Sagam Poetry
: Selection from Ramanujan’s Poems of Love and War
Women Poets in the Bhakti Movement
: Selection from Women Writing in India


Unit – II: Imaging Colonial India
Bankim Chandra
: Anandmath
O. Chandu Menon
: Indulekha
Bhishm Sahni
: Tamas


Unit – III : Many India’s
Karnad
: TaleDanda
U.R.Ananthamurthy
: Samskara
Mahasweta Devi
: “Rudali”
Basheer
: “The Card-Sharper’s Daughter”
Abhuri Chaya Devi
: “Bonsai Life”



Recommended Reading:
1. Aijaz Ahmed: “Indian Literature: Notes Towards the Definition of a Category” in In Theory
2. G.N. Devy: “Indian Literatures in English Translation”

Reading and Writing-II

This course is a continuation of Reading and Writing-I and aims at enabling students to become familiar with certain key concepts in current critical thinking about literature and culture. It will also facilitate a more rigorous form of reading which includes certain contemporary approaches to the study of literature and culture

Unit I: Keywords:
1) Modern and modernity
2) Modernism and Post-modernism
3) Dalit and subaltern
4) Hybridity and syncretism

Unit 2: Approaches
a) Liberal humanism
b) Structuralism
c) Post-structuralism
d) Post-colonialism
e) Feminism

Unit 3: Readings
1) Modernity, From Key Ideas in Sociology ( Extract) p.131-134
2) Brann, T Eva “What is Post-modernism?” The Harvard Review of Philosophy p.4-7
3) Raymond Williams, “When was Modernism”?

Unit 4
1) Hans Bertens Literary Theory: The Basics (extracts only) p.53-78; p.117-147; 193-237
2) Peter Barry , “Ten Tenets of Liberal Humanism” Beginning Theory p.20-23 p. 29-30
3) Peter Barry, Feminist Criticism, 121-130
4) Ibid p.192-200

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